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25mm Dominican Amber Fossil Pendant Beetle Insect with a Methane Bubble set in Sterling Silver

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25mm Dominican Amber Fossil Pendant Beetle Insect with a Methane Bubble set in Sterling Silver
$125.00

Availability: In stock

Fossil Amber with a Methane Bubble and Beetle Set in Sterling Silver
La Toca Formation, Dominican Republic


Early to Middle Miocene Period (20 - 15 Million Years Old)


Fossil Amber Pendant : 25.7 X 17.2 mm measuring the backing silver
1 inch = 2.54 cm = 25.4 mm


Inside the fossil amber, there is a beautiful methane bubble trapped inside a small pocket of fluid on one side of the pendant, while on the opposite side is a cute little beetle trapped in a position that look as though they are almost waving "HI!".


For this one of a kind specimen, it was set by hand in .925 sterling silver by local Central California Coast artist, Karin Gray.


This pendant was set in such a way to catch the light so that when it is turned it looks almost like a flame flashing!


Pendant will come with a thick 18 inch sterling silver snake chain to match the silver setting!

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Description

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Dominican amber is amber from the Dominican Republic, derived from resin of the extinct tree Hymenaea protera.

Dominican amber differentiates itself from Baltic amber by being nearly always transparent, and it has a higher number of fossil inclusions. This has enabled the detailed reconstruction of the ecosystem of a long-vanished Caribbean tropical forest 20 million years ago!

La Toca Formation is one of the formations of the Dominican Republic where Dominican amber is found. The amber is known for the many types of insects and other arthropods it contains and even mammalian hair, a leptodactylid frog and a gilled mushroom have also been discovered in the Dominican amber. Several genera of insects have been described on the basis of these inclusions in resin from the fossil Hymenaea protera tree and the many fossils found in the amber provided a unique insight in the paleobiology of the Caribbean of the time.

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